Viewing blog posts written by Gino DiCaro


CA super tort lawsuits setting dangerous national precedent

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on Aug. 13, 2018

More than 1.3 million Californians work in manufacturing and more than twelve million men and women nationally. We simply can't undermine the fairness of our nation’s legal system, our manufacturing base, and our economy with the emerging and baseless "super tort" lawsuits that have come to the fore in California. To that end, the National Association of Manufacturers' Lindsey de La Torre of their Manufacturing Accountability Project wrote an elucidative piece this week for California Political Review on the impact of these lawsuits and the need for the U.S. Supreme Court to consider and hear these cases - primarily the ongoing lead paint case - to shut the door on this dangerous precedent.


Baseless Lawsuits May Begin and End with California  --   By Lindsey de la Torre - Executive Director of NAM's Manufacturers Accountability Project.

August 10, 2018

Californians may not know it, but their courts are creating an unprecedented “super tort” that could be used against anyone that makes and sells a lawful product. Today, it is paint and tomorrow it could be you or your company.

In February, California’s Supreme Court surprised many experts by declining to review a high-profile case against paint and pigment makers that has been in the state’s court system since the early 2000s. In unprecedented rulings, the lower courts are making three companies pay more than a billion dollars to remove lead paint from all private homes built before 1951 across 10 California counties. The only option left for the companies is to take the case to the U.S. Supreme Court.

To some, this may not sound like a case of national importance, but it is. Lawsuits that seek to pursue businesses for money, regardless of wrongdoing, have been tried for four decades. In the past, state courts have stopped this including in Rhode Island, New Jersey and Illinois. This case is the first time a state high court has allowed this type of deep pocket jurisprudence to stand ... READ MORE ON CA POLITICAL REVIEW





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Nominations now open for 2019 STEP awards for Women in MFG

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on Aug. 10, 2018

CMTA is excited to announce that The Manufacturing Institute's 2019 STEP Ahead Award nominations are now open.

The National Association of Manufacturers' (NAM) Manufacturing Institute designed the STEP Ahead initiative to honor women who have demonstrated excellence and leadership in science, technology, engineering and production (STEP) careers. They hold positions at all levels of manufacturing, from the factory floor to the C-suite and illustrate the widespread impact women have on shaping the industry, whether they are running the company, designing the next big product or testing innovations on the shop floor.

All champions of the manufacturing industry should share this opportunity with their networks and nominate a female peer or colleague so that we can inspire the next generation.

In 2019, the Institute will honor 100 women and 30 Emerging Leaders, a category introduced to recognize women under the age of 30 who have achieved unique accomplishments at the start of their careers.

Visit www.themanufacturinginstitute.org/nominate to nominate someone before the nomination period closes on October 5, 2018.

For any questions or more information, download the Nominations Guide Toolkit or contact the Institute’s STEP Ahead team at STEPahead@nam.org.





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Site Selection magazine wants survey responses on business friendliness

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on Aug. 6, 2018

Site Selection Magazine is working on their annual piece ranking every state's business friendliness.  It's important for California manufacturers to help provide a picture of their challenges and benefits to operating in the state.  Your answers will remain anonymous but will go a long way in painting an accurate picture of what it's like to manufacture a product in California.  Please respond to Gary Daughters at Site Selection Magazine at gary.daughters@conway.com or 770-662-8950 if you can respond to some or all of the following questions:

  1. What part of the state are you in?
  2. What are two top attributes to your company’s location?
  3. What would you change about the business climate where you are?
  4. Has leaving California ever been an option for your company?
  5. How many people do you employ?
  6. What were your reasons for choosing to locate where you are?
  7. Would you be willing to participate in a telephone interview on the business climate where you are?




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ICYMI - Rothrock in the Sac Bee on connecting CA education to advanced workforce needs

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on July 30, 2018

In case you missed it last week, CMTA President Dorothy Rothrock wrote a piece for the Sacramento Bee, outlining just how important it is for California to pick up the pace of its severely neglected career and technology education (CTE) system in our middle and high schools. The combination of a lack of CTE, a technology explosion in manufacturing processes and rapid retirements of baby boomers -- to the clip of 10,000 a day nationally -- is perhaps creating the single most important challenge for manufacturers in California. Rothrock has received many emails of support since the article ran and will be doing a follow up piece on what she's hearing from the community.  See her piece and link to the full Bee article below.

If California wants a skilled workforce, why let career technical education go away?

by Dorothy Rothrock in The Sacramento Bee 

California is justifiably proud of its technologically advanced and diverse manufacturing economy. But the future is at risk if we don’t have a skilled workforce for these high-wage jobs.

California manufacturers already struggle to fill open positions, and the nationwide “skills gap” of unfilled jobs is estimated to reach 2 million by the year 2025. Sadly, the state is not doing enough to fill the pipeline of workers manufacturers will need in the years to come.

Part of the problem is a public education system that has been neglecting career and technical education, or “CTE”, for many decades. In 1987 nearly 74 percent of California high school students participated in at least one CTE class, but by 2009 this had fallen to a paltry 29 percent  

In 2011 alone, the state Department of Education reported that the number of CTE instructors dropped by some 20 percent from the year prior. Instead of acknowledging the crisis, the department decided to disavow their own report and stopped producing similar annual statistics on CTE, sweeping the disturbing trends under the rug ... READ MORE ON SAC BEE

 





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7 things a manufacturer can do on MFG Day

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on July 16, 2018

There are 49 manufacturing events already registered in California for the National Association of Manufacturers' MFGDay on October 5, 2018.  We need to hit 150 to show California's manufacturing chops in 2018. 

Here are some some things you can do to make your MFG Day a success.

One of the most important things to do is to establish a connection with your guests. Those few hours you spend with them are your chance to communicate the importance of what you do — and the creativity, advanced skills and technology required to do it. Ideally, your passion will spark something similar in the young people who you introduce to manufacturing, inspiring them to learn more about the industry and one day join the manufacturing team.

Follow these seven rules of thumb to improve your chances of connecting with your guests and inspire the next generation of modern manufacturers.

1. DON’T ASSUME VISITORS KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MANUFACTURING

In planning a good tour — especially when the intended audience members are primarily people with no manufacturing background — you have to start by creating a story of your company that anyone could understand.

How did your company get started?

What do you make? Who buys your products?

What do they do with them?

Keep explanations simple and free of industry jargon. Think storytelling with illustrations rather than textbooks packed with pages of small print.

 

2. YOU CAN’T SHOW EVERYTHING

The quickest way to lose the interest of your visitors is to try to show every bit of minutiae. Pick a few stops that represent key stages in the production process and allow you to demonstrate the progress a product makes through the shop.

What are the best places in the plant to give an overview of the production process and highlight the work of your people and machinery?

Where will visitors get the best view? Can they hear you?

Which of your team members are the most enthusiastic about their work and comfortable explaining what they do and why it is important to the process and the company?

These considerations should guide you in planning the tour.

 

3. CREATE A DISPLAY AND OFFER HANDS-ON EXPERIENCES

Of course you can’t allow visitors to get up close and personal with your machinery, but you could create a display that illustrates what a product looks like in various stages of completion, where they could be allowed to pick up and hold something they’ve seen made.

Maybe you even have something that one of your machines can make that they could take with them as a souvenir? (This doesn’t mean one of your production parts or finished products!)

 

4. CLEAN UP BEFORE YOUR VISITORS ARRIVE

No clutter, everything in its place, floors swept clean, a path through the shop is easy to follow.

Remember that part of the reason to invite visitors to Manufacturing Day events is to prove that manufacturing facilities are great places to work. First impressions count: What does your company look like as visitors approach from the parking lot? Let’s dispel the myths that manufacturing is dark, dirty and dangerous.

Also, make sure employees are dressed neat and clean on tour day and if they have a role to play in explaining things to your visitors, they should be wearing a name badge so that they can be addressed by name when there are questions.

 

5. CATER TO STUDENT VISITORS

Students are the workforce of the future. This is your opportunity to provide advice about the kinds of careers that your company offers, the type of training and educational coursework you seek when hiring employees. There is no better time to offer comments about opportunities available to dedicated workers with a professional attitude. If there are specific kinds of training or skills that you need and find it hard to hire for, let them know.

 

6. PUT UP A WELCOME SIGN

This is important both literally and figuratively. Put a sign on the door, shake hands with visitors, thank them for coming, and demonstrate your enthusiasm for the opportunity you have to share your company’s information with them.

 

7. SEND INVITATIONS

Manufacturing Day is a national celebration of the 12 million talented men and women who work in the industry. Who could you invite to share this celebration with you? Here are some ideas:

The families of your employees. If family events aren’t a common occurrence at your company, this is a perfect day to invite families to come and see where their family member works and learn what they do. Maybe you could do a special event just for family members at the end of the workday.

Your elected officials. Ever complain about the fact that your elected officials (local, state, federal) don’t make good choices as related to manufacturing? Invite them to come to your plant and see for themselves. Remember: Most elected officials have never set foot inside a manufacturing facility, which means you can educate them!

Potential customers. Give these folks a reason to want to do business with you. Invite them in on a day when they can see how great your organization is.

Current customers. Make Manufacturing Day your customer appreciation day. Your business service providers. When was the last time you were visited by your banker, insurance agent or accountant?

Media. Is there a local reporter who seems to have a serious interest in manufacturing? Invite them to visit your plant on Manufacturing Day. They are always looking for interesting stories to tell. Why not make it yours?

Youth organizations. Are you active in, or do you know someone who is active in the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts or a similar youth organization? Invite them to visit your company as a field trip. Better yet, invite a school group.

 

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