Viewing blog posts written by Gino DiCaro


ICYMI - Rothrock in the Sac Bee on connecting CA education to advanced workforce needs

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on July 30, 2018

In case you missed it last week, CMTA President Dorothy Rothrock wrote a piece for the Sacramento Bee, outlining just how important it is for California to pick up the pace of its severely neglected career and technology education (CTE) system in our middle and high schools. The combination of a lack of CTE, a technology explosion in manufacturing processes and rapid retirements of baby boomers -- to the clip of 10,000 a day nationally -- is perhaps creating the single most important challenge for manufacturers in California. Rothrock has received many emails of support since the article ran and will be doing a follow up piece on what she's hearing from the community.  See her piece and link to the full Bee article below.

If California wants a skilled workforce, why let career technical education go away?

by Dorothy Rothrock in The Sacramento Bee 

California is justifiably proud of its technologically advanced and diverse manufacturing economy. But the future is at risk if we don’t have a skilled workforce for these high-wage jobs.

California manufacturers already struggle to fill open positions, and the nationwide “skills gap” of unfilled jobs is estimated to reach 2 million by the year 2025. Sadly, the state is not doing enough to fill the pipeline of workers manufacturers will need in the years to come.

Part of the problem is a public education system that has been neglecting career and technical education, or “CTE”, for many decades. In 1987 nearly 74 percent of California high school students participated in at least one CTE class, but by 2009 this had fallen to a paltry 29 percent  

In 2011 alone, the state Department of Education reported that the number of CTE instructors dropped by some 20 percent from the year prior. Instead of acknowledging the crisis, the department decided to disavow their own report and stopped producing similar annual statistics on CTE, sweeping the disturbing trends under the rug ... READ MORE ON SAC BEE

 





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ICYMI: Funding for career, technical training vital to fill skills gap

Posted by Dorothy Rothrock, President on May 22, 2017

In case you missed it, I penned the following piece that was printed in the San Diego Union Tribune last week (May 19), highlighting the need to ensure that interested students have the opportunities they deserve to join California's exciting advanced manufacturing economy.

Funding for career, technical training vital to fill skills gap -- by Dorothy Rothrock 

Every day we hear about manufacturers embracing exciting new technologies to become more streamlined, efficient and competitive. California’s innovative companies are adopting advanced manufacturing techniques to meet our stringent new environmental sustainability goals.

California needs a skilled workforce to perform all the jobs in our increasingly complex manufacturing economy. Trained machinists, electrical and mechanical technicians are already in high demand and can command middle class and better wages without a college degree. As one of the largest industrial states in the country, we need thousands of new workers to operate robots, manage data, and program computers to support manufacturing design, production and logistical systems. ... READ MORE ON SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE





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California career tech education plummets in 2013

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on Feb. 9, 2014

Last week the state released its new data on career and technical education enrollments in the state's public high schools.  While overall high school enrollment was down less than one percent in 2013, career technical education course enrollments were down almost 12 percent and CTE teachers had declined by almost 20 percent.  

California manufacturers continue to find a growing lack of skilled workers out of our high schools, our community colleges and our universities.  The state's public schools must find ways to bring back these courses and expose our students to the tremendous opportunities of manufacturing skills and careers.

 

Career Tech Chart





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Sen. Rod Wright scores one for equal respect for all students' dreams

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on May 26, 2009

Last Thursday, the California State Senate voted in support of Sen. Wright's SB 381 on an overwhelming and bipartisan vote of 32-2  (2 no's: Simitian and Wiggins -- 5 abstains: Alquist, Cedillo, Oropeza, Romero, Wolk).  Over the weekend, the most emailed article out of the New York Times was a piece, written by Matthew Crawford, on how we have devalued working with our hands. The two items together represent a growing shift back to education reality and the fulfillment of all our students' dreams. 

Crawford summed up how, over time, our country has begun to view our children's success:
"A gifted young person who chooses to become a mechanic rather than to accumulate academic credentials is viewed as eccentric, if not self-destructive. There is a pervasive anxiety among parents that there is only one track to success for their children."


The fact that SB 381 passed so overwhelmingly shows that we might be reaching the tipping point for a more balanced educational system that provides more than the traditional access to a resume of academic credentials, but options for technical skills and careers.

SB 381 calls for curricular balance in school districts that adopt the UC/CSU course admission requirements (known as "a-g") as a high school graduation requirement, by also requiring those districts adopt alternative graduation coursework that includes the core academics currently mandated by the state, along with a series of at least three career technical education classes.

We must not forget also, that this bill is a simple and clear reminder to districts of their legal obligation to maintain curricular equity and balance, as outlined in Education Code Sections 51224 and 51228:
51224. The governing board of any school district maintaining a high school shall prescribe courses of study designed to provide the skills and knowledge required for adult life for pupils attending the schools within its school district. The governing board shall prescribe separate courses of study, including, but not limited to, a course of study designed to prepare prospective pupils for admission to state colleges and universities and a course of study for career technical training.
More 51228

California's manufacturers offer high paying but very technical careers to our workforce.  These jobs play an important role in our society and pay, on average, $20,000 more than service sector wages for our hard working families.  At the very least, students should have the choice of exposure to these skills and this particular pathway.   SB 381 takes a big step toward equality for all students' dreams and, after weeks of internal legislative squabbling, garnered almost unanimous support.  SB 381 now moves to the Assembly. Stay tuned.

Here's some video from the floor debate that's worth your time:

SB 381 Author, Sen. Rod Wright's, closing speech (4:41)


Sen. Mark Wyland on SB 381 (6:31)

Sen. Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg on SB 381 (4:46)

Sen. Bob Dutton, on SB 381 (1:08)


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Walters nails it on education

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on April 22, 2009

Yesterday, I wrote about how Dan Walters missed the mark on California's job woes.  Today, Walters nailed it on education.  He all but declared California's recently imposed high school exit exam a failure and the continued one-size-fits-all education system a serious threat to our children and workforce.

This blog and the many manufacturers it represents (along with the emerging torch bearer for the state's career technical education needs, the Get REAL coalition) gives equal respect for all students' dreams by demanding non-discriminatory educational resources to attain those dreams.  A mantra that has fallen flat in California's $60 billion education community.   That notion is substantiated by the fact that, over the past 10 years, high school dropouts have increased by 27 percent (reaching annual dropout rates around 35 percent) while crucial and inspiring technical courses have declined by 20 percent (and 50 percent over the last two decades).





Career technical education is often referred to in a positive light by the media and policymakers.  In fact there have been 253 CTE related bills introduced between 2000 and 2008, but take a look at recent policies and a few comments  during the continued CTE devastation.   Bottom line - rhetoric is getting our students nowhere in an education system that continues to grow in a one-size-fits-all manner.





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