Viewing blog posts written by Gino DiCaro


With 3.6% CA MFG growth, lots of room for improvement

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on Aug. 7, 2017

California continues to lag the country's manufacturing growth.  While California grew its manufacturing jobs by 3.6 percent, the rest of the country picked up 8.6 percent since the end of the recession.  Some big winner states include Kentucky at 20.5 percent, Indiana at 19.9 percent, South Carolina and Tennessee both at 16.5 percent, Colorado at 15.4 percent, and Ohio at 12.0 percent.  California must keep up the drumbeat of policies to atttract new manufacturing investment.

 





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Pay attention to manufacturing in the climate debate

Posted by Dorothy Rothrock, President on Aug. 26, 2016

In the wake of the Legislature passing new climate change bills this week, Governor Brown was asked about the impact on jobs. Part of his answer was “Manufacturing has been declining as a part of the American workforce for decades, and the decline in America generally is very similar to California.”  

Manufacturing is actually thriving in the United States.  Companies are increasingly choosing to relocate to the US due to wage growth in developing countries, logistical concerns, and poor intellectual property protection outside the US. It’s a good thing, too, because the direct jobs and ripple effect of manufacturing in the broader economy makes the US a powerhouse nation. A recent study by the MAPI institute showed that each manufacturing job supports a whopping 3.4 other non-manufacturing jobs.  

While the US as a whole is becoming more attractive to manufacturing than in prior decades, we have work to do in California. CMTA tracks manufacturing jobs and investment data in California compared to other states.  Since the recession ended in 2010 we have seen only slow job growth in California while other states are enjoying the boom.  In 2015, California had the lowest rate of all states for manufacturing investments for expansions or new sites. We haven’t received more than two percent of total US investments since the year 2000. That is far short of the 11 percent we need to attract each year to maintain our share of US manufacturing GDP.

It’s impossible to attribute any single state policy, even a big one like climate change, to any particular job growth or loss.  Many costs of doing business, litigation risks, and permitting challenges discourage investment and job creation in California.  But that shouldn’t give lawmakers a pass to not consider economic impacts when they adopt climate change policies. This is especially true when success depends on other states, who want to preserve their strong manufacturing economies, being willing to adopt similar policies and making meaningful reductions in global climate emissions.   

California voters support climate change laws but also want to protect manufacturing. In a recent poll by the California Business Roundtable, when asked if they support new climate change regulations the answer is a resounding “yes.” But when asked if they would support these policies if middle-class manufacturing jobs would be lost, 66 percent said they opposed.  

Reasonable regulations can be developed to achieve both environmental and economic goals for California.  Manufacturing jobs in California produce greener and cleaner products for the world.  It’s good policy and good politics to make sure manufacturing, in particular, is part of the climate change agenda. 





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We should attract more manufacturing investments to California - 1.5% is not enough

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on May 20, 2016

In 2015, according to new data on U.S. manufacturing investments, the country’s south and midwest regions gained the most manufacturing investments.  California was dead last among the 50 states with 1.07 manufacturing investments for every one million people, equating to only 1.5 percent of total investments. 

Sadly, this is the continuation of a trend. Since the recession ended in 2010, each year California has failed to attract more than two percent of the country’s new manufacturing facilities. Manufacturing employment has also lagged the US, with a 3.3 percent growth in California compared to 7.3 percent nationally.   

If California kept pace with the national manufacturing job growth rate, we would have 50,000 more high paying manufacturing jobs today.

Kentucky has been the country’s manufacturing leader for the last two years. In 2015 they enjoyed:

  • 39 manufacturing investments per one million people
  • 7 percent of the total U.S. manufacturing investment pie with only 1.3 percent of the US population
  • 17 percent growth in manufacturing jobs since the recession

“These disappointing numbers should be a wake-up call to state leaders.  Manufacturing investments support modernization, new product development, job retention and job growth that we need,” said CMTA’s Dorothy Rothrock. “We should find ways to improve the manufacturing business climate and attract our fair share of investments.”

manufacturing investments by state 2015
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manufacturing jobs ca vs us 2010 to 2015
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