Viewing blog posts written by Gino DiCaro


Manufacturing 4.0 is here!

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on May 30, 2019

The digital revolution is here. Manufacturing's digital revolution has brought about sweeping and dramatic change to the industry. From the connected factory to the proliferation of data to the leadership and culture necessary to embrace this digital shift, manufacturers of all sizes are exploring how to deploy new technologies and leverage them for a competitive advantage.

This is why CMTA has partnered with the Manufacturing Leadership Summit which takes place June 10-12 in Huntington Beach, CA, and is an event like no other for exploring Manufacturing 4.0 practices. Highlights from this year’s Summit agenda include:

  • A Leadership 4.0 keynote from Dow Chemical Senior VP Peter Holicki
  • Inspiring case studies from 3M and Saint-Gobain
  • Think tanks focused on IT/OT integration, sustainability, digital workforce skills, 5G networks, 3D printing, and more
  • The Manufacturing Leadership Awards program and gala, recognizing operational excellence

More than ever, deploying and integrating these new digital technologies is necessary for remaining competitive. CMTA members are receiving a special invitation to register for this event at the NAM member rate. We hope to see you there!





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California illustrates power of manufacturing on State of MFG Tour 2019

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on March 5, 2019

CMTA welcomed the National Association of Manufacturers to California last week to highlight the state’s modern manufacturing industry as part of the fifth annual NAM State of Manufacturing Tour.

The tour collectively opened eyes, changed minds, and recruited new people to be a part of our industry, by elevating the people and companies at the core of manufacturers’ excitement for the future.

During the visit, CMTA's new president Lance Hastings and NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons and Manufacturing Institute Executive Director Carolyn Lee met with students, business leaders and local manufacturers to discuss the industry’s optimistic outlook for the future, the high-tech, high paying opportunities in modern manufacturing and the urgent need to recruit the next generation of manufacturers.

We began the two-day visit at world-famous candy manufacturer and CMTA member Jelly Belly Candy Company, where we got an up-close look at the candy making process and, of course participated in many tastings. (You can see one particular one here)

Timmons, Hastings and Lee then toured Bishop-Wisecarver, an automation solutions provider. Following the tour Bishop-Wisecarver President and CMTA and NAM Board member Pamela Kan hosted a workforce opportunities discussion on how manufacturing companies can champion science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education in the community to inspire the next generation of manufacturers. The day was closed out by a visit to Pittsburg High School in Pittsburg, California, where the school’s robotics team discussed how STEM education is inspiring their future career aspirations (see student's excitement in 1 minute video here).

On Wednesday, Timmons, Lee and David Seaton, chairman and CEO of Fluor Corporation and NAM board chair started the day at Salesforce for a panel discussion with Achyut Jajoo, vice president of manufacturing, automotive, & energy industries at Salesforce and CMTA’s very own Lance Hastings. Business leaders from the San Francisco area heard from panel participants about how technology is transforming the manufacturing industry and the looming workforce crisis for California’s manufacturers.

“We’re at the next frontier of manufacturing in the United States. We’re leading in technological advances, such as artificial intelligence, robotics and augmented reality, that will actually spur job creation, boost wages and help us lift everyone up and leave no one behind,” said Timmons in his opening.

On workforce challenges later in the discussion, Hastings said, “We’re at this 3 dimensional crossroad between a workforce, the needs of a manufacturer and the fact that people aren’t looking at those 30 year careers. They might work in the same place for 10 or 20 years but their jobs are constantly changing and evolving. We need to be able to adapt our old model to the new millennial consumer workers, rapid innovation and a growing attrition of skilled workers.”

In total California was so excited to be a part of the NAM's State of Manufacturing Tour to help drive the powerful message of modern manufacturing and key priorities directly with people who will decide our future: students, educators, parents, manufacturers, business leaders, policymakers—and the press.

You can see some pictures below and you can watch the workforce discussion at Salesforce here.  You can read an opinion centered around the Tour and manufacturing authored by Jay Timmons and Pamela Kan in Fox and Hounds here.

 

 

 

 

 





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CA super tort lawsuits setting dangerous national precedent

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on Aug. 13, 2018

More than 1.3 million Californians work in manufacturing and more than twelve million men and women nationally. We simply can't undermine the fairness of our nation’s legal system, our manufacturing base, and our economy with the emerging and baseless "super tort" lawsuits that have come to the fore in California. To that end, the National Association of Manufacturers' Lindsey de La Torre of their Manufacturing Accountability Project wrote an elucidative piece this week for California Political Review on the impact of these lawsuits and the need for the U.S. Supreme Court to consider and hear these cases - primarily the ongoing lead paint case - to shut the door on this dangerous precedent.


Baseless Lawsuits May Begin and End with California  --   By Lindsey de la Torre - Executive Director of NAM's Manufacturers Accountability Project.

August 10, 2018

Californians may not know it, but their courts are creating an unprecedented “super tort” that could be used against anyone that makes and sells a lawful product. Today, it is paint and tomorrow it could be you or your company.

In February, California’s Supreme Court surprised many experts by declining to review a high-profile case against paint and pigment makers that has been in the state’s court system since the early 2000s. In unprecedented rulings, the lower courts are making three companies pay more than a billion dollars to remove lead paint from all private homes built before 1951 across 10 California counties. The only option left for the companies is to take the case to the U.S. Supreme Court.

To some, this may not sound like a case of national importance, but it is. Lawsuits that seek to pursue businesses for money, regardless of wrongdoing, have been tried for four decades. In the past, state courts have stopped this including in Rhode Island, New Jersey and Illinois. This case is the first time a state high court has allowed this type of deep pocket jurisprudence to stand ... READ MORE ON CA POLITICAL REVIEW





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Nominations now open for 2019 STEP awards for Women in MFG

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on Aug. 10, 2018

CMTA is excited to announce that The Manufacturing Institute's 2019 STEP Ahead Award nominations are now open.

The National Association of Manufacturers' (NAM) Manufacturing Institute designed the STEP Ahead initiative to honor women who have demonstrated excellence and leadership in science, technology, engineering and production (STEP) careers. They hold positions at all levels of manufacturing, from the factory floor to the C-suite and illustrate the widespread impact women have on shaping the industry, whether they are running the company, designing the next big product or testing innovations on the shop floor.

All champions of the manufacturing industry should share this opportunity with their networks and nominate a female peer or colleague so that we can inspire the next generation.

In 2019, the Institute will honor 100 women and 30 Emerging Leaders, a category introduced to recognize women under the age of 30 who have achieved unique accomplishments at the start of their careers.

Visit www.themanufacturinginstitute.org/nominate to nominate someone before the nomination period closes on October 5, 2018.

For any questions or more information, download the Nominations Guide Toolkit or contact the Institute’s STEP Ahead team at STEPahead@nam.org.





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7 things a manufacturer can do on MFG Day

Posted by Gino DiCaro, VP, Communications on July 16, 2018

There are 49 manufacturing events already registered in California for the National Association of Manufacturers' MFGDay on October 5, 2018.  We need to hit 150 to show California's manufacturing chops in 2018. 

Here are some some things you can do to make your MFG Day a success.

One of the most important things to do is to establish a connection with your guests. Those few hours you spend with them are your chance to communicate the importance of what you do — and the creativity, advanced skills and technology required to do it. Ideally, your passion will spark something similar in the young people who you introduce to manufacturing, inspiring them to learn more about the industry and one day join the manufacturing team.

Follow these seven rules of thumb to improve your chances of connecting with your guests and inspire the next generation of modern manufacturers.

1. DON’T ASSUME VISITORS KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MANUFACTURING

In planning a good tour — especially when the intended audience members are primarily people with no manufacturing background — you have to start by creating a story of your company that anyone could understand.

How did your company get started?

What do you make? Who buys your products?

What do they do with them?

Keep explanations simple and free of industry jargon. Think storytelling with illustrations rather than textbooks packed with pages of small print.

 

2. YOU CAN’T SHOW EVERYTHING

The quickest way to lose the interest of your visitors is to try to show every bit of minutiae. Pick a few stops that represent key stages in the production process and allow you to demonstrate the progress a product makes through the shop.

What are the best places in the plant to give an overview of the production process and highlight the work of your people and machinery?

Where will visitors get the best view? Can they hear you?

Which of your team members are the most enthusiastic about their work and comfortable explaining what they do and why it is important to the process and the company?

These considerations should guide you in planning the tour.

 

3. CREATE A DISPLAY AND OFFER HANDS-ON EXPERIENCES

Of course you can’t allow visitors to get up close and personal with your machinery, but you could create a display that illustrates what a product looks like in various stages of completion, where they could be allowed to pick up and hold something they’ve seen made.

Maybe you even have something that one of your machines can make that they could take with them as a souvenir? (This doesn’t mean one of your production parts or finished products!)

 

4. CLEAN UP BEFORE YOUR VISITORS ARRIVE

No clutter, everything in its place, floors swept clean, a path through the shop is easy to follow.

Remember that part of the reason to invite visitors to Manufacturing Day events is to prove that manufacturing facilities are great places to work. First impressions count: What does your company look like as visitors approach from the parking lot? Let’s dispel the myths that manufacturing is dark, dirty and dangerous.

Also, make sure employees are dressed neat and clean on tour day and if they have a role to play in explaining things to your visitors, they should be wearing a name badge so that they can be addressed by name when there are questions.

 

5. CATER TO STUDENT VISITORS

Students are the workforce of the future. This is your opportunity to provide advice about the kinds of careers that your company offers, the type of training and educational coursework you seek when hiring employees. There is no better time to offer comments about opportunities available to dedicated workers with a professional attitude. If there are specific kinds of training or skills that you need and find it hard to hire for, let them know.

 

6. PUT UP A WELCOME SIGN

This is important both literally and figuratively. Put a sign on the door, shake hands with visitors, thank them for coming, and demonstrate your enthusiasm for the opportunity you have to share your company’s information with them.

 

7. SEND INVITATIONS

Manufacturing Day is a national celebration of the 12 million talented men and women who work in the industry. Who could you invite to share this celebration with you? Here are some ideas:

The families of your employees. If family events aren’t a common occurrence at your company, this is a perfect day to invite families to come and see where their family member works and learn what they do. Maybe you could do a special event just for family members at the end of the workday.

Your elected officials. Ever complain about the fact that your elected officials (local, state, federal) don’t make good choices as related to manufacturing? Invite them to come to your plant and see for themselves. Remember: Most elected officials have never set foot inside a manufacturing facility, which means you can educate them!

Potential customers. Give these folks a reason to want to do business with you. Invite them in on a day when they can see how great your organization is.

Current customers. Make Manufacturing Day your customer appreciation day. Your business service providers. When was the last time you were visited by your banker, insurance agent or accountant?

Media. Is there a local reporter who seems to have a serious interest in manufacturing? Invite them to visit your plant on Manufacturing Day. They are always looking for interesting stories to tell. Why not make it yours?

Youth organizations. Are you active in, or do you know someone who is active in the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts or a similar youth organization? Invite them to visit your company as a field trip. Better yet, invite a school group.

 

Download NAM's Host Toolkit

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