Product Stewardship

By CMTA Staff

Capitol Update, Jan. 28, 2011 Share this on FacebookTweet thisEmail this to a friend

In spite of the down economy and, in some cases, because of it, local governments are increasingly looking at pushing the cost of disposing of products back to the manufacturers.  While local governments are feeling the pinch of budget cuts and escalating disposal costs, California manufacturers are struggling to stay in business.

With support from the carpet, rug and paint industries, extended producer responsibility bills were signed into law last year.  An issue that is yet to be resolved is the legality of the tax associated with these bills and using that money to pay for the implementation and ongoing operating costs.  In November, voters passed Proposition 26 that requires all tax bills passed after January 1, 2010, to have a 2/3 approval of the legislature – a feat not easily accomplished.

CalRecycle will hold an informal public workshop related to the rulemaking process for implementing the carpet stewardship law on February 22nd. CalRecycle must go through separate rulemakings for each law for items including:

  1. Stewardship plan approval criteria,
  2. CalRecycle’s process to accept payment for its services related to oversight and enforcement activities,
  3. Establishment of penalty ranges that reflect a progressive enforcement approach, and
  4. Criteria for acceptance of annual reports.

For more information, please see:

http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/EPR/PolicyLaw/Carpet.htm

CalRecycle will also hold an informal public workshop related to the rulemaking process for implementing the paint stewardship law on March 10th. Again, the separate rulemaking process applies. For more information, please see:

http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/EPR/PolicyLaw/Paint.htm

While manufacturers hoped that these two new laws would be enough to appease environmentalists in these tough economic times, Heidi Sanborn of the California Product Stewardship Council announced two weeks ago that her organization is targeting a number of additional items this year:  batteries, sharp instruments, lamps/lighting and packaging.  It appears likely that we will see bills requiring manufacturers to foot the bill to remove these products from the waste stream after their useful life has expired.

We have also become aware that Assemblymember Wes Chesbro (D-Eureka), a former member of the Integrated Waste Management Board, intends to hold a three-hour hearing on extended producer responsibility on the afternoon of March 8th.

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