Sustainable freight transport initiative

By CMTA Staff

Capitol Update, Feb. 7, 2014 Share this on FacebookTweet thisEmail this to a friend

In March last year, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) announced an effort to develop a “Sustainable Freight Transport Initiative” that would outline the needs and steps to transform California’s system to one that is more efficient and sustainable. Their strategy was to collaborate with key partners in the fields of air quality, transportation and energy.

The goals include:

  • Move goods more efficiently and with zero/near-zero emissions;
  • Transition to cleaner, renewable transportation energy sources;
  • Provide reliable velocity and expanded system capacity;
  • Integrate with national and international freight transportation systems; and
  • Support healthy, livable communities.
  • CARB wants to build upon air quality planning and modeling work that has shown the growing contribution of emissions from freight related sources and the need to transition to zero- and near-zero emission technologies over the next several decades. This transition will likely need to include widespread use of alternative transportation fuels such as grid-based electricity, hydrogen, and renewables which will have significant impacts on energy providers in California.

    Last week, CARB representatives met with CalTrade to explain their effort and solicit comments. CalTrade is a coalition of representatives of various business interests (including CMTA) combined with those of the primary modes of freight transport: rail, ports, highway and air. CARB expects to issue a preliminary report for comment about June or July of this year with a final report due out by the end of the year. They have pledged to conduct on-going discussions with CalTrade so that they thoroughly understand the implications of their recommendations on the economy and residents of the state.

    If you have a desire to be included in these meetings, please contact Mike Rogge at CMTA: mrogge@cmta.net.

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